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Registered Nurse / Home Care /$52.50, Vancouver, Travelnurse

Published 2022-06-30
Expires 2022-07-30
ID #1066792384
Free
Registered Nurse / Home Care /$52.50, Vancouver, Travelnurse
Canada, British Columbia, Vancouver,
Published June 30, 2022

Job details:

Job type: Full time
Contract type: Permanent
Salary type: Monthly
Occupation: Registered nurse / home care /$52.50
Remote:
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Description



About Travel

Nursing
TravelNurse offers you the freedom you need to make your travel dreams come true, without forcing you to leave your career or give up your income. With higher-than-average wages and travel and housing paid for, it is finally possible for you to take advantage of this time in your life where you’re able to explore. As a healthcare professional, your skills and expertise are in high demand. TravelNurse recruits healthcare professionals such as Nurse practitioners, Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses and Allied Healthcare Professionals (XRT, MLT, CLXT, UST) and offers flexible, rewarding positions. Travel positions, local casual shifts, permanent positions and everything in between.


What you’ll experience…


Amazing Locations – bustling cities, small town, rural and remote locations
FREE travel and accommodations
Exceptional wages *Wage rates may vary depending on the assignment locations, your experience and education.
Flexibility
24/7 Clinical and Travel Support
Educational paid sponsorship / Free Continuing Education
Bonus Incentives
Benefits / Life Insurance
Refer a friend and earn extra cash!

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    Travelnurse
    Registered on October 7, 2017

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    Tourism is travel for pleasure or business; also the theory and practice of touring, the business of attracting, accommodating, and entertaining tourists, and the business of operating tours. Tourism may be international, or within the traveller's country. The World Tourism Organization defines tourism more generally, in terms which go "beyond the common perception of tourism as being limited to holiday activity only", as people "traveling to and staying in places outside their usual environment for not more than one consecutive year for leisure, business and other purposes". Tourism can be domestic or international, and international tourism has both incoming and outgoing implications on a country's balance of payments. Today, tourism is a major source of income for many countries, and affects the economy of both the source and host countries, in some cases being of vital importance. Tourism suffered as a result of a strong economic slowdown of the late-2000s recession, between the second half of 2008 and the end of 2009, and the outbreak of the H1N1 influenza virus, but slowly recovered. International tourism receipts (the travel item in the balance of payments) grew to US$1.03 trillion (€740 billion) in 2011, corresponding to an increase in real terms of 3.8% from 2010. International tourist arrivals surpassed the milestone of 1 billion tourists globally for the first time in 2012, emerging markets such as China, Russia and Brazil had significantly increased their spending over the previous decade. The ITB Berlin is the world's leading tourism trade fair.


    British Columbia (BC) is the westernmost province in Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 5.1 million as of 2020, it is Canada's third-most populous province. The capital of British Columbia is Victoria, the fifteenth-largest metropolitan region in Canada, named for Queen Victoria, who ruled during the creation of the original colonies. The largest city is Vancouver, the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada, the largest in Western Canada, and the second-largest in the Pacific Northwest. In October 2013, British Columbia had an estimated population of 4,606,371 (about 2.5 million of whom were in Greater Vancouver). The province is currently governed by the British Columbia New Democratic Party, led by John Horgan, in a minority government with the confidence and supply of the Green Party of British Columbia. Horgan became premier as a result of a no-confidence motion on June 29, 2017. The first British settlement in the area was Fort Victoria, established in 1843, which gave rise to the City of Victoria, at first the capital of the separate Colony of Vancouver Island. Subsequently, on the mainland, the Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866) was founded by Richard Clement Moody and the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon Gold Rush. Moody was Chief Commissioner of Lands and Works for the Colony and the first Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia: he was hand-picked by the Colonial Office in London to transform British Columbia into the British Empire's "bulwark in the farthest west", and "to found a second England on the shores of the Pacific". Moody selected the site for and founded the original capital of British Columbia, New Westminster, established the Cariboo Road and Stanley Park, and designed the first version of the Coat of arms of British Columbia. Port Moody is named after him.In 1866, Vancouver Island became part of the colony of British Columbia, and Victoria became the united colony's capital. In 1871, British Columbia became the sixth province of Canada. Its Latin motto is Splendor sine occasu ("Splendour without Diminishment"). British Columbia evolved from British possessions that were established in what is now British Columbia by 1871. First Nations, the original inhabitants of the land, have a history of at least 10,000 years in the area. Today there are few treaties, and the question of Aboriginal Title, long ignored, has become a legal and political question of frequent debate as a result of recent court actions. Notably, the Tsilhqot'in Nation has established Aboriginal title to a portion of their territory, as a result of the 2014 Supreme Court of Canada decision in Tsilhqot'in Nation v British Columbia.

    Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/